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Don't Judge a Book By Its Cover

Day two of campaign canvassing was interesting. Why? Because we learned that looks can be deceiving. When we went door to door, we tried to imagine who would answer and how they might respond. At this one door, we were a bit anxious that maybe we had knocked on a Trump supporter's door.  There was loud music, the smell of cigarette smoking, and we could hear lots of men laughing inside. A bearded guy with a shaved head and a lit cigarette and baseball cap came to the door. As we introduced ourselves in the most polite way possible, we cautiously asked if he supported Hillary's campaign. To our surprise, he said that he was a BIG Hillary fan and that the other guy was an idiot. I think we were totally surprised. He went on to say that Trump did not respect people and that respect was really important to him. His stepson was our age and seemed very pleased that his stepfather was talking about his values in this way.

After we left him, we both admitted that we were totally shocked. Maybe we should not be so fast to assume that anyone who looks a certain way should believe a certain way.

The second surprise: We knocked on the door of a woman who had just come back from church. We asked her if she had voted and she said yes, but not for our candidate. We were shocked. She was a Latina who had immigrated here from Mexico with her family when she was a child. She had a daughter. We were really surprised and asked why she supported Trmp.  She didn't say, but we talked about the campaign and why we should respect each other. She said the world needed more love and compassion. In the end, it was an easy conversation with someone who didn't agree with our position because we all shared the desire to create a more peaceful and loving country.

The contrast between those two meetings reminded us that you can never judge a person on looks alone. People are complicated!

This lady is "Tee" Teresa May who has been working on campaigns since 1956 (when she was four)!

Comments

  1. Can't wait to hear more about Teresa May. I bet she has some interesting stories about working on past campaigns!

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