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The Day After

It was hard to wake up to the news this morning that America chose Donald Trump instead of Hillary Clinton. We did have a few bright spots, though:

1- Nevada turned blue.

2- Nevada elected the first Latina senator, Catherine Cortez Masto

3- We elected some great new women senators: Kamala Harris from California, Tammy Duckworth, Illinois and hopefully Maggie Hassan from New Hampshire. Maybe one of them will become president one day?!?

Maybe there's hope because if you look at this map on how young people voted, it is clear that they would have given us a different president.









Here we are at the beginning of the evening when we still thought Hillary's path to the White House would look like this:






Imagine if we didn't have the Electoral College. Hillary Clinton (like Al Gore in 2000) would be our president because she won the popular vote by more than 200,000 votes (and counting). Maybe it's time to consider whether we should have an Electoral College.


Sidebar: Our favorite encounter with a potential voter was with a woman who didn't speak any English and said she couldn't vote but that her husband was voting. She didn't say who he was voting for, but told us that if she could vote, she'd vote for Hillary. Then she asked us in Spanish:

"Le dices a Hillary que ponga lamparas por la calle porque es muy oscura?"

(English translation: Can you tell Hillary to put street lights on our street since it gets really dark?)

We are committed to going to Arizona in 4 years and turn that state blue next!





Comments

  1. How beautiful, that you connected with a voter who just wants a little more light in the darkness. <3

    ReplyDelete

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