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Honoring Journalists who Sacrificed their Lives

Every year, the third graders in my old elementary school perform in a Day of the Dead assembly that pays tribute to someone who has died in the past year. This year, they honored the many journalists who have been killed for daring to investigate facts others would prefer to hide. This year's theme was especially meaningful to my family since my grandmother was a Mexican journalist who spoke out against censorship. (Mexico is one of the most dangerous countries for journalists.)


I didn't get to attend today's performance, but here are some photos taken by my parents. (My younger brother got to perform this year.) The third grade Spanish-immersion teacher, Mr. Sierra, has been organizing these performances, which include dance, poetry, and music, for more than two decades! I’m glad he is teaching the children both about an honored tradition like Day of the Dead and the importance of a free (and protected) press. (A few years ago the performance honored the 43 students who disappeared in Ayotzinapa, Mexico.)

The Committee to Protect Journalists defends the right of journalists to report the news without fear and tracks the number of journalists threatened and killed around the world. You can learn more here: https://cpj.org/

Day of the Dead Performance with Maestro Sierra

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